Skip to content

Superintendent Godfrey sits down with two long-time Jordan School District elementary school teachers to ask the questions we hear from parents all the time. When is the right time to start reading to children and how can parents help students develop a love for reading?

But first, Superintendent Godfrey heads to South Jordan Elementary School where he talks to second-grade students about their favorite books and why they love to read.


Audio Transcription

(00:18):
Welcome to the Supercast. I'm your host, Superintendent Anthony Godfrey. Today, we're going to talk about reading and literacy. We'll talk about the best time for parents to get their children started reading and ways parents can help instill a lifelong love of reading in children. But first we head out to South Jordan Elementary School to talk to some second grade students about the books they enjoy. I'm the Superintendent for Jordan SchoolDistrict. You guys know what that means. Anybody have a guess.

Student:
You like, listen to kids, read.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I like to listen to kids read, that's right. You saw me doing that when I came in. Good job. What's your name?

Student:
Maddie

Student:
Maddie you're in second grade. What do you like to read Maddie?

Maddie:
About unicorns.

Superintendent Godfrey:
You like to read about unicorns, fiction or nonfiction. Oh, okay. And Liam, what do you like to read?

Student:
Lego books.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Lego books. So like how to build stuff or stories about Lego creatures and vehicles and stuff? Tell me about.

Student:
Like lion guys, like creatures and they have like these kinds of vehicles and they teleport through portals and a few bad guys.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So are they animals or people?

Student:
Animals.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Animals with Lego vehicles that go through portals. That sounds pretty exciting.

Student:
I like to read informational books about space.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Informational books, about space. Do you hope to conquer space as an astronaut or what's the plan?

Student:
Not really.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What do you like to read?

Student:
I like to eat Scooby Doo books.

Superintendent Godfrey:
You know, I can do a Scooby Doo impression, but it's not really impression of what's in the book bcCause that's just words on a page, right?

Student:
Yeah.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Watch the cartoon.

Student:
Yeah.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay. You want to hear it? You want to see what to do it?

Student:
That's pretty good.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thanks. Sorry to interrupt you guys, but thanks for letting me talk with you.

Thanks to the second grade students at South Jordan Elementary, we had a lot of fun talking to them and reading with them during our visit there.

Now we're back in studio with Laurie McCarty, a teacher at Terra Linda Elementary School and Bonnie Loki, a teacher and instructional coach at Heartland Elementary School. Alright, Bonnie, tell us a little bit about yourself and Lori.

Bonnie:
Bonnie Logan. I'm an instructional coach.  I'm located at Heartland Elementary and I love Jordan District. Go, Jordan.

Lori:
I'm Lori McCarty and I have been teaching kindergarten for 21 years. I have one son who went through the Jordan District school system.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So 21 years, that's a lot of five-year-olds. That is  awesome.

Teacher:
Yeah, I, they don't advance me. I keep saying I'm  in kindergarten. So now they're like 20 years old. This has happened this year. One of my kindergarteners is one of my kindergartner's children. Second generation, it's happened. It's awesome.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Well, thanks for coming. We're talking today about literacy for young children and we have this question every year. What should I be doing with my young children to help them not just learn to read, but learn to love to read. So what tips do you have for parents to make sure that kids learn to read and that they're passionate about it and it's exciting for them?

Teacher:
Well, parents have a huge influence with their children and they play a critical role in starting that literacy process and development. It's important to start right now, too, as soon as your child is born or even in the womb, start reading to them. Let them develop the love of reading by watching you read and watching you write all the time. Make it a consistent practice that you guys do in your home, where it becomes a part of your daily routine, right from the very start.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Just make it part of what you do. It's just what we do we read.

Teacher:
Yeah. It can be a part of your nap time routine, your bedtime routine, have books in the cars, but make it part of your daily routine.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I like those suggestions because what that means is that maybe you're anchoring it to some other things that are already part of your routine. When we're in the car, going to bed, first thing in the morning, just some things that are already making up your day, reading to those events during the day.

Teacher:
Yeah. I think it's also important to create a cozy little nook in your home too. That it's fun to cuddle up with your child and read a book. And it's amazing that you are reading and you're developing those literacy skills with your children, and you are really creating a strong bond with your child. It's really crucial quality time that you have with your children. And in fact, oftentimes when we ask children, "What is your favorite activity to do with your parents?" A lot of times they will revert back and say, "When we cuddle up and have story time."

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's great. Well, I have to admit that when you said cuddle up and cozy little nook, it sounds like I want to have a nice hot cup of cocoa and a Minky Couture throw. That's a great idea. So that might happen later this weekend. So tell us, what else can parents do? We get a routine, have a nice kind of a comfortable spot. And remember that it's a bond between a parent.

Teacher:
Yes, I think it's also important to let them pick books that they're interested in. Find out the interest of your children and help them find those books. Make going to the library to check out books a fun day, a fun date with your child to have an adventure and really let them have a say in what books they're going to read. It's important to also introduce them to informative texts so they can learn that sometimes we're reading stories and we're receiving a story from it. However, other times we are reading to learn about a specific topic. Maybe it would be dinosaurs, maybe it would be dancing. Maybe it would be bugs. But it begins to develop that interest, the thirst for reading for information.

Superintendent Godfrey:
And a library is a good resource for that. You can just ask a librarian and say, "Where can I find some green informative texts?" Now I used to teach English and we called it fiction and nonfiction way back when, and nonfiction is just like, well, it's not fiction, but I guess we'll read it anyway. It's nice. Informational text is a much better way to refer to it. I love that. So what other tips would you have for parents who want to be sure that their kids are readers right from the start?

Teacher:
Well, as you're reading for reading with them, one thing to keep in mind is that you're building vocabulary. And so, especially in informative texts to be talking about if it's an animal that they're interested in, you know, "What do you think that word means?" Or "Today in the classroom, we read about a character that had scraggly hair." And so we talked about "What do you think that would look like?" And we had a lot of fun trying to figure out what scraggly hair probably looked like and drawing those pictures of that and building on some visualization. So not only are you building vocabulary, but you're building the skill of being able to visualize some of those things as you get into different texts that don't have a lot of pictures.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So do you actively tap into the child's imagination by asking, "What do you think scraggly hair would look like? Or what does that sound like?"

Teacher:
Yes, absolutely. It's so important to have them imagine what that would look like or think about what they would do if they were in that story and ask those questions, have that dialogue. And as you're in that cozy place with your child to have that dialogue with your child, what did you think of this story? What do you wish would have happened at the end or any sort of conversation just about it, just to have that time of dialoguing about the characters, the setting, or the problem or the solution.

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's a good reminder, to think about questions that you can ask to kind of activate the child's imagination and maybe have them ask some questions of themselves about the text, so they're interacting with the text. That's something that I can forget to do sometimes when I'm reading my son. My youngest is 10, but we still read it.

Teacher:
Right. And depending on what a child's exposure is, sometimes they're almost intimidated to step into that imaginary land. They think there's a right or a wrong answer. And so for them to just be able to just fantasize about what they think it could be, it's kind of unfamiliar territory for some children.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So it's good, right from the start to ask them those questions. I like that there's not a right or wrong answer. It's just their reaction. And they get to react to it the way they want to. Is there a certain amount of time that parents ought to be reading with their child every day? I've heard numbers knocked around about how many books you should have read to your child by the beginning of kindergarten. Any recommendations that way?

Teacher:
The more you read to your child, their attention span will lengthen. So as that lengthens, you can increase the time that you're reading nightly with your students.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So you just need to be sensitive to the child's attention span.

Teacher:
Absolutely. I have the opposite problem. A lot of times with my kids, they would outlast me and they would want to read so long that I'm falling asleep and I start to read jibberish. So if you have any tricks for how you can be in a cozy nook and still stay awake while reading to your kids, please let me know.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So are there, are there some things not to do? Are there some things that become kind of an obstacle to encouraging reading in children?

Teacher:
Well, I just wanted to say, and it's tagging onto what you said, as a working parent, sometimes you're exhausted and I just want to skip it. I don't have a half an hour. I don't have time just to read. Don't feel like you have to have a certain amount of time that's bookmarks, right? You can start it and stop it. There's a skill in that and talking about what did we, what happened yesterday in the story? What was the beginning? Now let's continue. What do you think's going to happen next? So don't be intimidated. If you don't have a lot of time in the evening, I know what that's like as a working parent. So just read as much as you can.

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's great advice because sometimes we put this expectation on our central. I've got to read for half an hour, where just being consistent for five minutes is probably better than, than trying to force that.

Teacher:
I loved the way you said consistency, because honestly, that is the key. If you're consistently reading for five minutes with your children each night, do it. But make sure it's a consistent practice.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So read every day, gauge their level of interest, your ability to stay awake and blend it together, to just create an experience they can look forward to every day.

Teacher:
Absolutely make it a fun activity with that child.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay. We'll take a quick break. And when we come back, we'll talk about some of the skills be aware of as you're reading to your children, to help them begin to develop into independent readers. We'll be right back.

Sandra Reisgraf:
How many times do you hear your child ask, "What's for breakfast or what's for lunch?" Find out what's on the menu at your child's Jordan School District school every day by simply downloading the Nutri-slice app to your smartphone or desktop. The Nutri-slice app gives you quick and easy access to daily menus, pictures of meal choices and nutrition information, along with allergens present in the food. The app also allows students and parents to give feedback on food. Download the Nutri-slice app today and enjoy school breakfast and lunch in your school cafeteria.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Alright. We're back from the break with Lori McCarty from Terra Linda and Bonnie Loki from Heartland Elementary. And they're here to talk with us about reading with your young children before they get to kindergarten. What are some of the specific skills that we can help support children in developing so they become independent readers on their own. What do parents need to be aware of so that they can have a solid foundation?

Teacher:
When you begin reading with your child, it's really important to go over concepts of print with them. And that simply means, how you hold the book, turning a page when we're looking at that page, where do we start to read on that page. Which direction do we go? Letting them know that you read from left to right and top to bottom, just those very, very basic skills that children develop as they are immersed with reading. It's also important for them to start to understand that those letters on the pages are delivering the message and that they are intrigued with that. And they want to read to find out what message that book is holding. I like to tell my students, when they're learning the alphabet, that this is just a magical process. And if you can learn these letters and you can learn the sounds that these letters make, you're able to make these words.

And with these words, we make sentences and with sentences we can write stories. And then we can read stories and write about our stories and it unlocks a whole magical process and a whole new adventure for the child. But that adventure honestly starts with how do we hold a book and where do we begin to read on that page. Environmental print is a huge thing for young children. What's environmental print? As we are driving around running our errands, we always see these signs of McDonald's and Burger King. And these are signs and words that these children see all the time. It's the print that they see throughout their environment, but these children naturally pick up on these words and they're able to read these words. We want to help them with these, play games in the car. What word can you find? Or can you find a letter B on this sign. Playing those fun games, getting them excited about the print is a great way to spark their motivation.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What about reading the same book over and over and over and over again? I've done that many times and I've tried to be a really good dad and not say anything about how many times we've read that same book. Even, as I described earlier, tried to stay awake through that same book. Is there value in that? Should we allow some kids to just keep reading the same book over and over again?

Teacher:
Yes, absolutely. The child wants to read that book over and over because they love it. They have interest in that, and that is a way to build their motivation. It also helps them with learning certain skills in that book and building fluency with maybe the letters or the words in that book as well.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Sorry parents, you have to keep reading that book over and over again.

Teacher:
And it also helps with comprehension. I love to do that even in the classroom. Read the same book and go deeper and talk more about some comprehension skills I'm inferring. What do you think's going to happen next? And why do we know that? And for me, that's so much fun to delve in when you've read the book more than once and to really start talking about why you think the character said that, or what you think they were looking at then. It's kind of like giving you a chocolate chip cookie and only letting you have one your entire life. It does not sound like a good idea.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Oh, you love those cookies. Enjoy them all the time. You can tell.  It makes sense to me that reading the book over and over again has benefits. What if you feel like a child wants to keep reading books that are too easy for them, or maybe aren't challenging them? Is it better to let the child choose the book and allow them to read something that's of interest? Or do you need to be thoughtful about making sure that they're progressing with more and more difficult texts?

Teacher:
I believe there's a balance with that. We want to keep our child or children motivated with reading. We want them to have the opportunity of choice and choosing books. They want to read. However, we do want to be able to push their skills and help them develop deeper vocabulary, deeper comprehension, and there's a time and a place for both. And when a text is easier for a child, that is a time when you can delve in a little bit more to some comprehension or even do some writing beyond it. You know, if you were to write some more to this story, what do you think would happen next if there was a day two to this story? So there's an advantage sometimes, of having a text that's a little bit easier. So then you can go deeper with some of your questioning and have some fun with it.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So texts at different levels of difficulty can accomplish different things.

Teacher:
Absolutely.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Yeah. Tell me some of your favorite books for young readers, some great picture books, some books that are perennial favorites.

Teacher:
Chicka-Chicka-Boom-Boom, Brown Bear, Brown bear. The Mitten is fun. Pete, the Cat books.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What are good resources for parents to go to, to find lists of books or ideas for what they can read to their child?

Teacher:
Any library would have a list, but you can also go to the Media Specialist at your school. Talk to your child's teacher, and they could give you a list of books that would be appropriate for your child's reading level.

Superintendent Godfrey:
We're going to take a break. And when we come back, we'll talk about how to address concerns you may have regarding your child's reading skills. Stay with us.

Sandra Reisgraf:
Do you want to know what's going on in Jordan School District, maybe see your child or a friend featured in a school story? Check out our website at jordandistrict.org or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter at Jordan District. Let's connect today.

Superintendent:
We're back with Lori and Bonnie, talking about their ESY for very young children. If a parent is worried that their child might be falling behind in reading skills, is there a sign for them to watch for, or what should they do if they have concerns?

Teacher:
Honestly, you need to go talk to your child's teacher. That's what the teachers are there for. They're professionals. They're working with your child daily and they know your child's reading skills. So approach them. Have a conversation with them. Ask them for helps and tips that you can be doing to work with your child at home. Some things that you can do to further their development. Going to your teacher is the best.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thank you very much for being with us. This is great information. We end every podcast with Two Truths and a Lie. It's your chance to lie to the Superintendent. And I can tell that Lori is dying to lie to me. So, it's your time. I can see it in your eyes. So let's do this. Two Truths and a Lie.

Teacher:
Okay. I used to work for a movie star. I ran my first marathon this summer and I've been to every state except for one.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I wanted to ask a follow-up question on every single one of those. So let's see, I'm going to say that you have not run a marathon.

Teacher:
I haven't. Wow.

Superintendent:
I guess my lie meter continues to work. It was honed when I was an Assistant Principal at the high school. It's still working, fortunately. So tell me about which state have you not been to?

Superintendent Godfrey:
Alaska. Yeah. Just made it to Alaska. It's my 50th birthday. My 50th state. I made it. Are you going to go? Are you hoping to go?

Teacher:
It's not where I'm planning on going to anytime soon, but it's on my bucket list making the other 49.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Yeah. Thank you. I'm dying to know which movie star.

Teacher:
She's old school, butI worked for Mia Faro.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Really? Wow. In what capacity?

Teacher:
A tutor to one of her children. She's adopted several children when I lived in Connecticut. And so I had one of her students that I worked with.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Fascinating. How long did you work with Mia?

Teacher:
Oh gosh. It wasn't that long. It was just through the summer because I worked in the classroom with him and then tutored him over the summer, but I went to her home and everything.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Wow.

Teacher:
Yeah. So pictures of Frank Sinatra. Should this all be on? Maybe Mia doesn't want to know that she doesn't want to know about it.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I'm not sure Mia listens to the podcast.  If Mia is listening....

Teacher:
I think she's a fan.

Superintendent:
Mia, if you're listening.....

Teacher:
She's a follower of your's, I'm sure.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thank you very much. Both of you. That was fantastic. And remember, education is the most important thing you'll do today. We'll see you out there. [inaudible].

Show Audio Transcription
Share the Supercast!

They are hoping to make it big in the music industry one day and are well on their way. Superintendent Anthony Godfrey sits down with the singing Keller sisters from Herriman High School to talk about their journey to success and how their parents and teachers have played a role.

Cheyenne and Caysi Keller have already auditioned for The Voice, American Idol and America’s Got Talent – on this podcast they sing for the Superintendent.


Audio Transcription

Superintendent Godfrey:
Welcome to the Supercast. I'm your host, Superintendent Anthony Godfrey. Today, we're going to talk to Herriman High School singing Keller sisters. They share their journey as they seek successful careers in the music industry. Caysi, who's a sophomore and Cheyenne, a junior at Herriman High, also talk about how teachers have helped along the way, and they share some advice on what parents can do to support their teams who have big dreams. But before we sit down with them to talk, let's give you a little taste of their singing.

Music

Superintendent Godfrey:
You were listening to Caysi and Cheyenne Keller singing a Walls by the Lumineers. Now let's sit down with the singing sisters in the super studio. So you're both into music.

Sisters:
Totally

Superintendent Godfrey:
Chy, tell me first, a little bit about your involvement in music.

Chy:
When I was little, I was just looking for my path in life, I guess. I saw a picture of my great, great grandpa that I never got to meet and he was playing the guitar. My dad told me a little story, how he was the first country music star on TV. So this little nine year old got her first guitar. Then I just played every day since, so my fingers bled and my mom was yelling at me to come in and eat dinner. That's where it started.

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's wonderful, playing until your fingers bled. That's part of many a guitarist's origin story. There's the legend of Eric Clapton. who just holed up in a London apartment. I think it was for a year. He just decided that he wanted to be good. So that's all he did for a year until his fingers bled. He slept a little bit, ate a little bit and played guitar.

Chy:
Yeah, it happens. It's an addiction.

Superintendent Godfrey:
It starts off as an addiction, but you got to start to balance things out, I guess.

Chy:
Yeah. That's what my parents told me.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay.  Well, I think that qualifies as a productive addiction. And Caysi, tell me about your involvement in music.

Cysi:
I got into singing when I was about 10 years old. My friends, like my best friend, her parents had a performing arts facility. And she just asked me to come check it out. And so I went and I performed with the group and I just fell in love immediately. I'd been seeing for years earlier making goofy videos with me and Chy, but I finally decided to take it seriously and started taking voice lessons. So at about 10 years old, I started taking voice lessons, and been doing it ever since.

Chy:
We somehow had to get the Taylor Swift sound. I like to play guitar, but I didn't like to sing, but we had to play Taylor Swift. You know, it's that age. So we had to get a singer and she definitely had to fill that spot for us.

Superintendent Godfrey
I admire her work. It's difficult for me to connect to it because I'm not going through the experiences anymore. She describes, she says we are never, ever, ever getting back together. I can look back on when I decided that I was never getting back together, but I am not in that circumstance anymore.

Caysi:
We're in a constant state of Taylor Swift vibes. So it's just that age.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What's another Taylor Swift vibe that you connect to? I mean, that's very personal because she talks about some, Oh yeah.

Chy:
That's a good song. I knew you were trouble. That one's kind of hitting me hard lately.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I knew you were in trouble. Yes, she does have a gift. Caysi, did you ever have any interest in an instrument?

Caysi:
I actually took piano lessons for a long time, but I just couldn't quite get into it. I can play some chords on it now and same with guitar and the ukulele, but I'm not super great at anything except I feel like I'm pretty good at singing.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So you dabbled, but you dabbled for a long time and it just didn't spark. The singing is what really took off.

Caysi:
It clicked ]for me, just like the guitar clicked for Chy and she, of course, can play every other instrument on earth, but the guitar is her instrument.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Chy, you're one of those who can just pick up a guitar or any other instrument and start to learn it.

Chy:
I definitely went through an experimental phase, playing the banjo and the piano and the drums for a minute. I went through a lot of shifting with instruments, but I always come back to guitar.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Guitar is a favorite of mine. I've played the ukulele. The guitalele a little bit because my 10 year old, it's just the right size for him to play. So that guitalele is kind of an in between. So do you compose anything or do you like to perform what others have put together mostly?

Caysi:
We are kind of starting down that composition thing. It's hard to finish songs, but we definitely start a lot. The thing that we really like to do is take other people's music that inspires us and change it to our sound that we're finding. We're trying to write more so of our own songs now, but nothing has come up yet. It has finished. We haven't got a single original finished yet. We have like a lot started, but we really like covering. What we perform with are cover songs.

Chy:
There was a point where I wanted to be a writer. One of the things I read was that the way you become a writer is by reading a lot and to write to imitate people that you like. Then you learn your own style. I think that's probably true when you're writing music. There are other musicians that you like, you emulate, you take their song and you make it something different. And then over time, you find your own voice.

Caysi:
Exactly. This is exactly what happened. If we didn't do the cover songs, I don't think we would have ever found the sound we have now, which we really liked.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Yeah. What are some of the songs that you've covered that you've changed?

Chy:
Basically, every song we play, we changed because it's kind of limiting with just two people and a guitar or some other instruments, you know? So we have to change the songs anyway. And then our song, our sound that we have together just kind of comes out as we go through it. We moved from Idaho three years ago. In Idaho we got all of our best friends and we had an all girl rock band.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So it was so awesome.

Chy:
We played Idaho Go-Go's. We are called Falling Up. It was honestly really cool. And we had all the sound. We definitely played Joan Jett and we're jumping.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I love that. You're finding inspiration in music from various artists, as groups, as individuals, you have your own voice, but then you're able to find a common voice together. I also love that you're covering Cyndi Lauper.

Caysi:
We'll definitely play that one.

Superintendent Godfrey:

I have her autograph. I sought it.

Caysi:
Oh my gosh. That's honestly awesome.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Yes. I went to her concert and I was standing out with the groupies and it was not in the eighties. It was like five years ago, but she waved while walking into the bus and then I got a set list signed from the concert. Not very many teenagers are very excited to hear me say that I have Cindy Lauper's autograph on the side. It's refreshing to find a couple who are. I also have the Yellow vinyl version of she's so unusual that I bought at Barnes and Noble. So I, yeah, you're really striking a cord, so to speak, pun intended. Okay. I'm dying to hear some music, but let's talk more about  you as musicians. Do you like to perform live? Do you prefer the recording and creating process? Let's start with Caysi.  What's most invigorating for you?

Caysi:
So, everything about music is a totally different dynamic than everything else. I love performing because you feel so much from a crowd of people. It's beyond anything I can even describe, there is just so much energy from the people around you. It's just really inspiring and uplifting, playing and sharing this art and seeing their reaction to it is really beautiful to me.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I can imagine. There's almost an electricity to being up in front of the crowd. I've done it a few times, just for fun, like in an assembly as an assistant principal, when none of the kids can go anywhere, so they have to stay and listen. And even at that is really fun, just to be in front and kind of feed off of that energy. We're going to take a quick break and we'll come back to talk more with the Keller sisters.

Sandra Reisgraf:
How many times do you hear your child ask, "What's for breakfast or what's for lunch?" Find out what's on the menu at your child's Jordan School District school every day by simply downloading the Nutri-slice app to your smartphone or desktop. The Nutri-slice app gives you quick and easy access to daily menus, pictures of meal choices and nutrition information, along with allergens present in the food. The app also allows students and parents to give feedback on food. Download the Nutri-slice app today and enjoy school breakfast and lunch in your school cafeteria.

Superintendent Godfrey:
And we're back with the Keller sisters talking about music. Obviously you don't just get to this point. I know you're still in high school, but you've really developed your talent for a long time. I'm very impressed with how you're able to articulate how music fits into your life. You don't get there without great support. Tell me about how your parents have supported this for you.

Chy:
They're everything. They do everything. They literally just changed our entire basement to a recording studio. We moved down here to Utah from Idaho for music. We lived in Pocatello, Idaho, and God bless everybody in that town, but there's not a lot of music presence there. So to get better vocal lessons or different vocal lessons, our parents drove she and I to Utah, three hours a couple of times a month for lessons. We met an amazing voice teacher here and fell in love with that. From there we started performing a ton, so we moved down here just for that really, because we were driving so much. It made sense since we were taking it so seriously. So they definitely changed everything. They are the reason we're in music, honestly. They're not musical, but they gave us more than ever.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I think that's remarkable, even though it isn't their passion or their talent, they see it in you.

Chy:
Yeah. And they help us follow it. Right?

Superintendent Godfrey:
Yep. How have school music programs been a support to what you want to pursue?

Caysi:
I took choir. I never thought I would have an interest in choir until I took it. I took it there and I had hope and I really discovered a love for singing through that, entirely. It really grew my passion to be doing it in school and out of school to gain a reputation and to be recognized for what I was so passionate about doing. I still am doing choir and it's really a fun thing to do to meet people and continue to grow and learn every day about something you didn't know about before. It's crazy looking back. The school has honestly been as supportive as our parents.

Chy:
Her choir teacher would get us performances. Mr. Hellman, my teacher would get his performances and even here in Utah, we cover Marlin.

Caysi:
Oh yeah. We performed at our school talent show at Copper Mountain and then the one at Herriman. The one at Copper Mountain, my principal saw and, in front of everyone, he asked us if we would want to perform again. And so we set up during our yearbook signing, we played for about an hour and a half for the yearbook signing. All our friends and everyone at the school was just circling around the room and we had just played the whole time. And it was a really different kind of game for us. It got us so much more experience and it was really good. So the schools, they're really supportive of our passions. I think I see it a lot. The teachers are amazing. Every music teacher, every teacher I've had has been so impressed and so supportive. It's been honestly awesome to watch. It's really awesome.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What advice do you have for parents who want to be supportive of whatever talent or interest their child might want to pursue?

Chy:
Hmm. Well, we're always changing, but I think you can see in your child's eyes, something that sets their soul on fire, something that sticks to me. You can see it in them, even on their worst days, something, they come back to. You just don't let them loose something that is their purpose in life. You've got to find your purpose in life. I feel that even on your worst days, you can still have, because people are going to come into your life that you love, that you are going to miss. And there's something about music for me that has always been there. So definitely, you can tell what someone's passion is. I think by the way they look at it , they feel it and just support them and don't let them lose it.

Caysi:
And I would say, don't get discouraged because we love music. Obviously it is like everything about our lives, we will still have those days when we don't want to do it, when we just want to lay on the couch or watch TV. But at the end of the day, it's not going to ruin us. It's not over for us. We'll still come back tomorrow with a reignited passion. Kids are hard because we do just sometimes want to be bums and lay around. But you always have that connection to that, you know, music or whatever it is. So my advice would be, don't let them loose their passion. Let them grow with it.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I like what you both said about, it's what you come back to. It's what you come back to. And we're going to come back to the podcast very soon and learn about their experiences with the music industry, with show business. And I'll give you a hint. America's Got Voice. We'll be right back.

Sandra Reisgraf:
In Jordan School District, the possibilities are endless for anyone looking to grow with a team of professionals, working together to provide the very best for students in education. If you're looking for a great job with great pay and benefits, in a supportive environment, head to workatjordan.org and find your future career in Jordan School District. People come for the job and stay for the adventure. Explore the many options apply today at workatjordan.org.

(19:15):
And we're back with the Keller sisters talking about music. Now you've had some experience with the music industry. Tell us a little bit about what you've been up to.

(19:28):
So I'm shy and I kind of started that with auditioning for America's got talent. That was how long ago now? Three years, three years, ish, three years ago. We first auditioned for America's got talent and didn't go very far, but it was really fun to get like, you know, into that professional industry. So we I specifically kept auditioning for the voice and recently American idol and I keep getting farther every time. So hopefully that'll just one day snap through and be on TV.

(20:16):
Tell me about the experience you had at the farthest point with one of those shows.

(20:21):
So let's see. I went to LA to audition for the voice I had just been invited. I got an email. They asked me to come to LA and audition and it was not like anything I've ever done before, but I was really confident and I met the producers and, you know, talked with the TV guys, like the recording people, people with the cameras and interviews and stuff like that. It was really it wasn't quite what you see on TV. It's more personal, I guess less showy, but you meet a lot of interesting people. Interesting seniors.

(21:14):
So you met fellow competitors. Yeah.

(21:16):
In like waiting rooms and stuff like that. We would introduce ourselves and everyone was super outgoing. So it was easy to meet.

(21:25):
So you weren't quietly squaring at each other, trying to case out the talent you're up against.

(21:32):
I feel like it's not that competitive because every voice is so different. It's kind of like comparing apples and oranges, you know,

(21:38):
Makes sense. I like them both. Yeah,

(21:41):
Exactly. But she's honestly being modest about like the show thing, because she sent in a video just of her singing to American idol and they invited her to come back and perform live even though she's under age. So you're supposed to be 16. I was five days before the cutoff, my birthday was so they invited her back and I have to go with her because she doesn't like to sing alone and she gets a little scared. So I always get to go and participate in the audition process. It's pretty cool. And there was like five people in the room. And she was the only one that they wanted to keep talking to and the other, they sent the others home and they just told her that they were so impressed with her and they were, it was, she was amazing. And it was honestly so cool. They were so nice to all those seniors in the room, but it was definitely amazing to see her at her young age, being able to come in and blow these producers away that are surrounded by so much talent all the time. It was really cool to watch my little sister be like fan girl about by these LA people.

(22:54):
So does that mean that you'll be headed back next year?

(22:58):
I will be auditioning whether they invite you.

(23:01):
I think from the sound of it, you have great things ahead and I'm going to get in early and I'm going to request tickets front row tickets and access to the meet and greet. And I'll buy a lot of merch though. You can count it.

(23:22):
Okay, good. Are you going to buy the vinyl records?

(23:25):
I'm hoping that you're going to put out the color vinyl splatter. You can count on me buying every vinyl version of your first release. So plant on it. And when you're writing a song, when you're looking to write a song, I think the moving from Idaho thing moved, leave the Idaho and rodeo to go see, I mean, it's already rhyming. The song writes itself. You're right. You're right. Yeah. Well, let's let's hear some music. We'll take a quick break and we'll come back to here's some tunes from the Keller sisters.

(24:01):
Sweet. Awesome.

(24:04):
Hello. My name is Steven Hall. I'm director of the Jordan education foundation. Have you ever experienced what it's like to surprise a teacher in the classroom with school supplies, books, or a classroom grant? Have you seen students all smiles because you cared enough to give them a backpack, a winter coat weekend, food bags, or a free holiday shopping spree. It's something we see all the time because it is exactly what Jordan education foundation does. The foundation exists due to the generosity of people who care about kids. If you would like to be a part of supporting students and teachers in the classroom, contact Jordan education foundation and start making a difference today, you can find us at Jordan education foundation.

(25:00):
[Inaudible],

(25:01):
We're going to let them play us out with girls. Just want to have fun. Thanks to the Keller sisters for being here. I have a hunch. This isn't going to be the last time that I see you guys. I'm requesting front row tickets and advantage immediately access. And I hope you'll sign my color vinyl version of your So just remember education is the most important thing you'll do today. We'll see you out there and now planning this out. The Keller sisters with girls. Just want to hear

(25:53):
[Inaudible]. I [inaudible] in the middle of [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible].

Show Audio Transcription
Share the Supercast!

This podcast addresses suicide prevention.

Lt. Governor Spencer Cox shares his personal experience and hard work to raise suicide prevention awareness in Utah.

Then, Jordan School District Health and Wellness Specialist, McKinley Withers, shares advice for parents on how to start a conversation about suicide prevention with students. How do you open the lines of communication and keep the conversation going.

If you or anyone you know needs help, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or by calling the University of Utah Crisis Line at 801-587-3000. You can also download the SafeUT app.

For additional resources visit wellness.jordandistrict.org


Audio Transcription

The following podcast is about suicide prevention. If you or anyone, you know, needs help contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or locally by calling the university of Utah CrisisLine at (801) 587-3000 or download the SAFE UT app.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Welcome to the Supercast. I'm your host, Superintendent Anthony Godfrey. Today, we're going to talk about something that is impacting far too many families throughout Utah and the country right now. And that's suicide. More importantly, we're going to talk about suicide prevention in just a moment. We'll hear from our Jordan School District Health and Wellness Specialists, McKinley Withers. He joined us on the podcast previously with the episode titled, Happiness Forecast. He has information and resources for us to help prevent suicide, information for parents about what to do, if they're worried about their teen or just what they ought to be talking with their teen about, even if they don't see signs of a problem. But first, we had the opportunity to talk to Lieutenant Governor Spencer Cox, who has a very personal story to tell. He's raising awareness statewide and has an important message for students when it comes to suicide prevention. Lieutenant Governor Cox.

Thank you very much for taking a few moments to talk with us for the podcast. You've been an advocate for suicide prevention. Tell us a little bit about some of what's been happening lately.

Sepncer Cox:
Well, we have some really exciting announcements around suicide prevention, as you know. This has been a struggle for our state, unfortunately the numbers of those that we've lost over the past few years have been unacceptable and, of course, losing any life. These are all preventable deaths. And so we really have turned a corner in Utah, in focus on this at a pub public policy level. We started about two years ago, the Governor Suicide Prevention Task Force, and coming out of that task force with some of the best and brightest in the state, we've had some incredible ideas.

The legislature has been very supportive. One of those ideas was the creation of a fund to help us to help us with suicide prevention awareness. We've never had a true statewide campaign with all stakeholders involved, to make sure that we're giving people good information and helping people understand where they can go for help and how to overcome those dark feelings that so many of us have had, me included. And so we got a million dollars from the legislature, if we could match it from the private sector. We announced yesterday, and we're so excited about this, the private sector stepped up. We now have the $2 million. We are just going through the RFP process right now for that suicide prevention campaign. And next year we will be launching that. It's a huge deal for Utah. We're very excited. And we just have to do more to help, especially our young people, understand that we need them to stay. That this life is so important and that things will get better.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thank you very much. That's an exciting initiative. And you've been a personal advocate because of some personal experiences that you went through. And I know you connected to one of our students on a field trip up to visit you. Can you tell us a little bit about that?

Spencer Cox:
Happy to. So, a few years ago I went to a conference on Suicide Prevention and I had my talking points all ready that my staff had helped me prepare and I listened to the stories of survivors. I listened to stories of parents who had lost their children. And I was just taken back to a time when I struggled and I realized that we needed to talk about this more, that talking about it is actually healthy. That it's good, that it helps kids understand that they're not alone because when we get in those dark times, we feel like we're the only one and we must be broken and there's something wrong with us. I went through that in middle school. I was bullied. My parents had been divorced. It was a really dark time for me.

And I started thinking that maybe the world would be a better place if I wasn't in it. And I'm so grateful that I had people I could talk to. People that believed in me, people that helped me. And I'm just grateful that I stayed in and I have an incredible life. So I I've started sharing that now, as I travel around and I did meet with some students from your District that were at my office. They're always taken back a little They're there to tour the Capitol and see things. And why is this guy talking to us about suicide prevention? But I want them to know that it's okay and that they're not alone. And what we do know is that in a class of 30 to 35 kids, seven of them have had those thoughts.

There's a power in understanding that and realizing that and encouraging people to talk to someone, to find someone, whether it's a friend, a family member, a counselor, a teacher, someone that they can talk to about what they're feeling. And so I mentioned that to these kids and just said, "Hey, look, I know what some of you right now in this room are thinking about. I know you are statistics tell me there are probably five or six of you. And you need to find someone to talk to, anyone. And if you can't talk to anyone, talk to me. And as we finished, a student came up and said, can I give you a hug? And I said, sure. And she told me, I'm one of those that's been thinking about it.

And this is the other thing. Sometimes we don't know what to do. And if you're not one of those five or six people, then you have a friend that is, so talk about it. And I just said, I thank you for sharing that with me. You know, don't freak out. Just tell them how much you love them. And then, and then refer them and help them get help. And that's what I did. I said, thank you for sharing that. It means the world to me. We talked for a few minutes about her feelings. And then I was able to talk to some of the administrators and counselors and get her some help. And I understand she's doing much better. And so it seems really simple, but that's how we save lives.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thank you. That's great advice because so many people are afraid of talking about it. They're worried that if they talk about it, it'll make things worse or give someone an idea, when in fact, like you said, it just emphasizes that you're not alone and that this isn't a unique thing for someone to feel. And for someone in your position to be willing to talk about it, like you said, on a Capitol tour of all things, to be able to talk about that, it's just what we need to be doing. And I really appreciate your example in that way. Is there any last words of encouragement you would give any students listening to the podcast?

Spencer Cox:
Well, I would just tell students everywhere how powerful they are and the potential that they have that they don't even realize yet. There are so many great days ahead. And we love you. We're excited for your future, and even if it seems hopeless and dark right now, it is not, trust me. Please find someone to reach out to. I would encourage everyone to download the SAFE Utah app on their phones, at the push of a button. When you find yourself in those dark moments in crisis, you can be connected anonymously, if you want to be with a mental health professional, who can walk through those things with you. And if you don't have access to a smartphone or a tablet to do that, you can you can always just pick up the phone and call the Suicide Lifeline here in the state. It's 1-800-273-TALK, that's 1-800-273-TALK. And please, please, please find someone to talk to. There are better days ahead.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Lt. Governor Cox, thank you so much for taking the time. I know you're busy. We really appreciate it. Thank you.

We're back in studio with McKinley Withers, the Health and Wellness Specialist for Jordan School District. So McKinley, I want to focus specifically on what parents can do to help prevent suicide. First off, should parents talk to their children about suicide?

McKinley:
Yes, definitely. And there is a myth out there that talking about it might plant the idea in a child's head or might make them think about it if they weren't before. There's no reason to believe that's the case. It's safe to talk about it. And, in fact, it's one of the best ways to begin the conversation and also to get help for your child. It helps alleviate those feelings that they may be having, just to know that their parent has asked directly actually about that. So great.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So in what ways do we go about asking that question? How do we approach the topic with our kids? Because you don't just want out of the blue, want to say, "Hey, by the way", it's always hard to approach topics like that. How do we go about it?

McKinley:
You can safely assume that your child has heard about it already, that the media, that they are exposed to that. It's already talking about it. They may have seen it in shows. They've heard it mentioned. So you're not the first person to bring it up. And that's important to acknowledge so that you feel a little bit more comfortable with asking about it. So that can come up naturally in conversations about some of their media content. Maybe they've come across it at school, or maybe they've asked a question. But also if you're seeing any signs that they're struggling or acting differently, I think that a really inviting and open way to ask the question is something along the lines of, "I've noticed that you've been struggling a little bit, you've been having a hard time. And I've heard that a lot of kids your age, when they struggle might have thoughts of hurting themselves, is that something you've ever thought about?" And the reason that's a good way to ask the question is it already tells them, you're aware that a lot of other kids have that issue. So it doesn't make them feel bad about it. So they're more likely to say, "Well, yeah, I have thought about it."

Superintendent Godfrey:
I like that. That makes a lot of sense. So let's say that they say, no, I haven't. Then what do you say after that?

McKinley:
Well, thank you for talking to me. And if you do ever have those thoughts or feelings, just know that I'm here and I'm always willing to talk about it and make sure that you get the help that you need, which starts with me.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What if they say yes. Okay.

McKinley:
So, there's actually a pretty good chance that you could hear yes. And that can be a scary thought for many people.

But if somebody says yes, it doesn't mean that they've necessarily made a plan, that it's imminent. Simply that they've thought about it before.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Right. So where do you go from there?

McKinley:
And I'll tell you, I think it's important to say how not to react, because if you want to close down that conversation, say something like, "Oh, well that would be stupid. Or, you know you wouldn't want to go and do something like that, would you?" Because that makes them not feel safe. And they might say, "Oh, you're right. I'm not thinking about it. So acknowledging and validating, I think that is a really good general rule for parents when it comes to these difficult conversations, is to remember that if it matters to the child, then it matters. So don't downplay whatever it is that they're struggling with by saying, "Oh, you're thinking about hurting yourself over that breakup.  I thought you guys were together for three weeks. That's ridiculous. Right." So you can see how that, rather than, "Wow. I didn't realize that's so hard and I'm here to help."

Superintendent Godfrey:
That makes a lot of sense. So I think that starting with don't freak out, don't tell them that it's dumb that they're concerned, or that they are struggling with those thoughts or shut down that conversation, but to open it up and validate whatever it is that matters to them. Have that conversation. And you can almost use that same sentence structure that we use to ask the question and say, "well, I've heard that many kids struggle with these feelings and thoughts, and I've also heard that they get better and that there is hope, and that there is help available. And I want to be here for you".

Superintendent Godfrey:
I'm just sitting across from you hearing it's a hypothetical, I know, but it kind of feels good to hear that even in a hypothetical situation. So I can see that would be very effective. And I can definitely see how easy it would be to try to convince the child that you're not in a situation where you would ever need to do that. And it would not feel like talking to them out of it. It would just be shutting down lines of communication. And so it makes a lot of sense to me that if it's a yes, if it's a no, whatever the answer is, you want to do whatever you can to keep the lines of communication open.

McKinley:
We have a tendency to minimize because that feels safer. We don't want it to be a problem either. We don't want our kid to be suicidal or so you want to say, well stop that, you know, turn that off. And  be done with that and let's move on, but that's not going to help them feel better. That's going to shut them down. So rather than minimizing, just continuing that supportive listening relationship. And I'll tell you, I think that our most impactful moments of suicide prevention are way before that crisis conversation, right? It's our everyday interactions that open up that line of communication. It's our mundane validation of the child's behavior. Whatever it is that matters to them, if we've told them that their thoughts and feelings matter on a consistent basis, when they're struggling, you've made that investment. And that's when that particular conversation goes a lot better because you've proved to them that you're a trusted person.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So keep the conversation going with your child, ask about suicide when you can, when you can make it part of the conversation, whether the answer is yes or no, don't minimize. Keep the communication open. What signs should parents watch for? They should talk with their child about suicide regardless, but what are the warning signs to be concerned about?

McKinley:
So we're going to talk about three primary areas of concern, where warning signs are typically expressed, what words, what they might say, actions, things they might be doing and circumstances or situations they might be in. So with words, anything that would indicate that they feel like a burden, this family would be a lot better if I weren't here, or if they're often expressing feelings of even loneliness isolation. I don't have any friends or I don't have anything that I could be doing. You know, they feel bored often. I mean, they're expressing that they're just don't feel value in their life or feel purposeful or and especially again, I'm going to say this word again, because it's very important, that they feel like a burden to their friends or to the family, that they're not worth something.

Okay. And also with words, they may say something about hurting themselves and that's important to take seriously. Even if it's ingest sometimes. Sure. So whether they're talking about feeling like a burden or even hurting themselves and then actions, so when it comes to behavior, you're looking for big changes. And sometimes I guess I shouldn't say big changes. It might be subtle changes, but something that's off in how they're acting, whether that's sleeping too much, sleeping, too little eating, too much eating, too little increases in substance abuse, they're isolating withdrawing. And then the third area is situations. So if you know about a breakup or if you know about, they were cut from a team or even a divorce in your family or the loss of a friend or a family member, someone who's died, those are situational factors. That really what you're looking for is a combination of things. You might hear a few words that are a little bit off. You might see a few changes that in their behavior that are a little bit off, but you also might be aware of some circumstances. So it's not that every breakup is there on the path to hurting themselves, but if they've had a breakup and they've also been acting a little bit differently and not dealing with it, how you would expect, and you've also heard them saying some things that would indicate they don't feel valued, I would be concerned.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay, we're going to take a quick break. Then we'll be back with McKinley Withers to talk about how we can keep our home safe and what resources are when we do see that there's a problem.

Break:
Hey, you okay?

Yeah. I just have a lot of stuff going on in my head.

You need to talk, dude, stop hiding behind the happy face. Talk with no filter, get the safe UT app, download it now available on the Apple app store, Google play or SafeUT.org.

Superintendent Godfrey:
And we're back here with McKinley Withers, the Health and Wellness Specialist for Jordan School District. McKinley, tell me how can we create a safe environment at home?

McKinley:
So there are a few things to think about when it comes to safety in the home. We've already talked a lot about safe conversations, so it's important to keep that safe conversation going. That it's okay to talk about these serious topics with our children and to build their trust with them.

When they are struggling, the other type of safety is physical safety. We want to create a home environment that if someone were struggling and they were going to make an impulsive or sudden decision to hurt themselves, that there is time and distance between them and something that would hurt them. So to create that kind of safety, we need to consider primarily two things, pills and guns.

Oftentimes we don't think to lock up or create a distance or time and distance between a child and pills, but that's an important thing to consider in your home. Does my child have too easy of access to pills and the other is guns? Those need to be locked up, kept away from children. If there is a combination on a safe, change it, just so that you're confident and certain that your children don't have access to a loaded gun.

Superintendent Godfrey:
McKinley. What resources are available to parents who are worried about their children?

McKinley:
So there are several and your greatest tool is in most people's pockets. Your cell phone can be a great resource. If you'd say to Siri, "I'm thinking about hurting myself or someone in my home is thinking about hurting themselves", Siri will automatically offer to call the National Prevention Lifeline. That's something you can try just to practice it. Know that it's there. You can actually just call that number. So that's 1-800-273-TALK, so you just spell talk.

You can use the Safe UT app, which will connect you to the U of U Crisis Line, which you can also just call directly at (801) 587-3000. The U of U Crisis Line is connected to the Mobile Crisis Outreach Team in the Salt Lake Valley. So if there is the need, for someone will come physically to your house to support an individual who might be struggling. Then that team can be reached through that number as well.

And then also, you can check wellness.jordandistrict.org. There are a number of resources and connections for those difficult situations.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What about school counselors and school psychologists? Parents can always contact them for help.

McKinley:
Definitely. Yeah. We've got the best in the business as you know. So if you're not sure where to go, the individuals at your school can help you. They are great people who care about kids. No question about it.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Yeah. Well, thank you very much for your time McKinley. I recommend that folks listen to the other podcast episode we already have, and we'll have future podcast episodes about happiness, health, wellness, how to connect, communicating well with your child. It's really about creating that healthy environment at home. So thanks again for all your help.

McKinley:
Thanks for having me.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thanks for joining us on the podcast. And remember, education is the most important thing you'll do today. We'll see you.

McKinley:
If you or anyone you know needs help, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or locally by calling the University of Utah Crisis Line at (801) 587-3000 or download the Safe UT app.

Show Audio Transcription
Share the Supercast!

Utah Jazz legend Thurl Bailey talks about growing up in a home where he was never allowed to be average. He even sings for the Superintendent.

Then we hear from a second grade student, a middle school student and a high school senior. They all have questions for the Superintendent.


Audio Transcription

Superintendent Godfrey:
Welcome to the Supercast. I'm your host, Superintendent Anthony Godfrey. Today we take our podcast to new heights, literally, by talking about the importance of education and learning with six foot 11 inch Utah Jazz legend Thurl Bailey. Then we'll head back to the studio to visit with a second grader named Lincoln, a middle school student named Cade, and a high school senior name to Emily. We have a lot to learn from them, so I hope you'll stick around. But first here's Thurl Bailey who gave us a little taste of his musical talents. [inaudible]

Superintendent Godfrey:
Here with Thurl Bailey, who just gave an inspiring speech to our Administrative Leadership Conference between us. We have 12 years in the NBA and it's been a great experience to be able to talk with Mr. Bailey here today. Thanks again for being with us. You talked about how people in your life had a big influence in your success. I was really impressed with that. Your message wasn't about you. It was about the influence of important people at key moments in your life. Can you tell us about the role that your parents have played in your success?

Thurl:
Well, my parents obviously played the major role in me being the type of person I am today. And as a parent now, I understand the job of a parent is to be that influencer and teacher at home and disciplinary. And then, growing up in DC, a lot of kids didn't have that. They didn't have a mom and a dad that were there and parented jointly. So I was very fortunate. They really laid the foundation for us as kids. Education was number one. I was threatened that I couldn't come home with C's or below by my parents. And, in your mind, you wonder why, because a lot of people will say, well, a C is a passing grade and my mom made it clear that C was average and she didn't raise average kids.

And so our goal was, our job was to go in and do above average work, do the work and, and ask the right questions to the right people. And so it was just a great foundation, especially in an environment I grew up in. And I just believe that everybody we come across are influencers and educators in one way or another on the positive side and on the other side of it. So in the end, it really is about having information. It's about getting that education. And it's about understanding that people are there for you and to help you if you want it. We know a lot of people who will sit there and not ask a question and fail because they don't take it the next step further and ask the question. So my parents really gave us a really good beginning of how to communicate and then just how to progress in your life.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I love the message from your mom about expectations, that she expected you to be working hard and to achieve. And she would accept nothing less and expectations make a big difference, right?

Thurl:
That's what was implanted early. And that's really a good point you're making because if it's implanted early on, the parents are reinforcing that, right? The kids have a certain expectation. It's not just about their achievement. They want to do it for other people. They want to show their parents that they're working very hard, but until that's consistently planted in you in the beginning, a lot of kids don't have that for one reason or another. Maybe some of the reasons aren't their fault, but that's when you have other people like these educators and the administrators that come into their lives and tell them, I see that potential in you. I know you can do it. And I'm here with you. If you want to commit.

Superintendent Godfrey:
You know, it's really hard to hold the microphone up that high. It kind of wears on my arm a little bit. Any last words of encouragement for our students that, you know, times are tough. There's a lot of anxiety out there. Kids are working hard. Social, emotional wellness is something we really focus on. Any words of encouragement for kids out there that may be struggling or questioning their own worth.

Thurls:
Yeah. I say, you've got so much potential. One of the things that I try to encourage kids to do is to find what they're passionate about. Find something that they're passionate about and don't ever, ever think that they can't achieve it or should go through it alone. There are people that care, there are people that want to help and their development and in their success. I know you don't know anyone who's ever been successful on their own. And so they have all the tools and the help that they need, but sometimes it takes a little courage, right? To take that step and say, listen, I need help. This is what I want. I'm passionate about it. Can you help me get to the next level? Or can you help me find someone who can help me with this? And I think that's one of the things that a lot of technology has taken out of a kid's somewhat, is the ability to communicate and do that without having to be through a phone.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thank you so much great messages. And I've watched you for a long time as a player and a commentator. And I can't tell you what a thrill, it's been very inspiring day to spend time with you.

Thurl:
Thank you very much. Take care of the best you.

Superintendent Godfrey:
We're back in studio. Thanks again to Thurl Bailey for sharing his thoughts on education. Now, we have superstars of our own who've been kind enough to join us.

Students:
Gabe I'm from Oquirrh Hills and I'm going to ninth grade. I'm Emily, and I'm going to be a senior this year.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Tell me about what you're looking forward to and what your plans are and hopes are for the coming year.

Gabe:
I'm looking forward to meeting a lot of new people, a lot of the new teachers that are transferring into the school, and I'm hoping for it to be a great year and have some pretty good teachers.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Yeah, that's great. I'm glad that you're looking forward to meeting new people. That's a big part of being in school. It's kind of a target rich environment for making your friends and for being able to connect and have some fun. How about you, Emily? What are you looking forward to this year? Senior year?

Emily:
Yeah, the big one. I'm really excited for the classes that I'm taking. I'm through with all my required classes. So I'm doing business law and sports marketing, just getting into some more specific classes that are gonna be really interesting to me.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So do you know what you want to do?

Emily:
I know I'm interested in marketing, but hopefully the classes will give me a little bit of direction because right now, I don't know.

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's a great part of high school. You get to try some things that maybe you won't be able to do down the line that gives you a little bit of a chance to experiment and see what you like.

Emily:
Yeah. I'm really excited for it.

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's great. Lincoln, what are you thinking about for this coming school year? What are you hoping for this year? What are you excited about going back to school, going to second grade?

Lincoln:
So you're excited about moving on to second grade by the end of first grade where you kind of looking forward to second grade already.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What do you like most about school? You like what? You like the end of school? Well, I think we all liked the end of our day and when we feel the accomplishment of getting to the end of the year. We'll come back again to you, Lincoln. Let's talk a little bit about, there's actually a book out there that you probably haven't read because it really wouldn't apply to you. But I think you may have some insights the book has to offer. And the book is "What I Wish My Teacher Knew". So I'm wanting to ask you that same question, not any specific teacher of yours, but we've all been through school. All adults have been through school at one time or another. And so we all sometimes get the impression that we know what it's like and that we can remember what it's like and that we haven't figured out. So can you tell me anything that you wish adults knew that they don't seem to know about what it's like to be in your shoes?

Emily:
I feel like a lot of classes that I have just so many assignments and so many worksheets, and you're moving through these units really quickly. And there isn't enough time. I don't know. I feel like there's too much emphasis on turning in your homework and getting a good grade on a test rather than actually understanding what you're doing. And so I wish that classes could move a little slower and I know there's curriculum that you have to cover, but sometimes I think it could be a day or two extra, like to fully learn things.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So sometimes it feels like maybe there's too much happening in too short a time.

Emily:
Yeah.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay. How about you, Gabe?

Gabe:
I wish the teachers knew they need to get more involved with students because kids learn better when they're having fun. I remember things when I was having fun back in elementary and I remember those things more than I did when I was just sitting behind a desk, looking at a paper.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So when teachers are engaging, when they make things fun. And they involve their students. Okay. So you definitely couldn't tell a class that's focused on students and that brings that out. Okay, great. Lincoln, what are some of the things that you really like that your teachers have done in your class? What are some things you really liked about your first grade teacher?

Lincoln:
She started with an ELA class. So you like your friends in the class and her name started with L like your name.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Oh, Ms. Lee Lincoln. That's awesome. Can you remember any of your favorite books?

Lincoln:
The book with no pictures.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Alright. We're going to take a quick break and we'll be right back. Stay with us.

Sandra Reisgraf:
If you're always looking for opportunities to learn something new, why not join us for the next Jordan Parent University? Jordan Parent University is an opportunity for parents to better understand issues that impact their own students and education. It's an evening class designed to help parents with things like planning for the road beyond high school, better understanding  of students' social and emotional health and wellness. And knowing who to call when there are issues involving a school or a student, Jordan Parent University is free and open to the public. For a list of upcoming classes, times and locations go to jpu.jordandistrict.org. See you there.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Welcome back. We're here in studio with Gabe, Emily, and Lincoln, talking about the coming school year and asking what their goals are for the school year to come. So I'm just going to ask each of them to talk about one goal that they have for the school year. Okay. So Gabe, why don't you tell us.

Gabe:
One goal I would like to see the school year is to have classes that are more in depth into certain subjects, such as salesmanship and marketing.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay. So you want to get a little deeper into some of the subjects?

Gabe:
Exactly.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Salesmanship and marketing. Is that something that you're interested in? Maybe down the line?

Gabe:
Yes.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Alright. Very good. What do you want to sell? Whatever's thrown your way?

Gabe:
Exactly. Whatever works.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay. Awesome. And Emily, tell me, what's your goal for this year?

Emily:
My goal for this year is to make more friends and be more outgoing than I have been the past two years.

Superintendent Godfrey:
It's a little bit hard sometimes. Isn't it?

Emily:
Yeah. That's about it.

Superintendent Godfrey:
And talk to any old person like me who graduated in the 19 hundreds and they will tell you that they wish they could go back and be more outgoing and be more friendly and make more connections.

Emily:
Yeah.

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's great. Great goals. What do you like to learn about Lincoln? If you have a favorite animal, what's your favorite animal?

LIncoln:
A horse.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What do you like about horses?

Lincoln:
Oh, sorry. A horse just walked by.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What do you like about horses? Do you ride horses?

Lincoln:
They're cute. Faces.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Do you know what I say when I see a horse that seems sad? Say, why the long face you haven't had a horse before? Would you like to have a horse someday? Your mom doesn't want a horse?

Well, my mom didn't even want a dog. So Lincoln, do you have a question for me?

Lincoln:
Do you have a dog?

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thank you for asking. I have a dog named Molly. Molly is a white dog. And if I say her name in particular way, she knows, I just might give her a walk and she knows how to sit right on the carpet in just the right spot and look at me and pull your ears up. I'm ready to hear my name called for you to take me for a while. So she understands that she doesn't understand. I've had a long day and I may not want to walk around the block a few times, but I always feel better after I do walk her.

Do you have chickens?

Likes chicken is White Dandelion, Dandelion, the White Chick. When he grows up, he'll eat the most eggs for breakfast. When he grows up, he'll lay the most eggs. Tell you all of them about the eggs, because the ones that lay cool eggs. So some of them lay cooler eggs than others.

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's so cool. You know, Lincoln, I might need you to name my next dog because I named my dog, Molly. And that's not halfway as exciting. Given your chickens. I'm glad you liked the name. I feel better about that. Now, Emily, you have two dogs.

Emily:
I do have two dogs. They are Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and yeah, I know. And they act the part. They are, have to be waited on hand and foot constantly. Yeah, Barclay and Freckles. They're brothers. They're Barclay and Freckles. Barclay as in Big Bird's dog andFreckles because he has freckles on his mouth and I love them. They're the best.

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's fine. How big are they?

Emily:
They're pretty little. They probably each weigh 15 pounds and they're full size. Good size dog to have in the house. Just about Molly. What kind of dog is Molly?

Superintendent Godfrey:
A West Highland Terrier.

Emily:
Don't think I know what that is.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay. Gabe, any pets?

Gabe:
I have a cat.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What's your cat's name? Fiona. Fiona. Very nice. That sounds like a cat name.

Gabe:
Yeah.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Interesting. Yeah. A lot of personality?

Gabe:
That's not how I'd put it, but personality. Yeah, pretty much. Fiona just lays around the house or why she lays around and hunts and that's pretty much it.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Oh, she lays around except when she's hunting.

Gabe:
Yeah. So she was an alley cat and she came to her back door and so we pretty much just adopted her from there, but ever since we bought her, we've never had a rat problem.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I can imagine. Sounds like Fiona gives the impression of not being ready to pounce, but then comes out of nowhere.

Gabe:
Yeah, yeah. Yeah. She's brought some interesting stuff. She wants brought us a snake to our back door.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Oh yeah, absolutely.

Gabe:
Yeah. She sat there at the door and just started meowing until we came out to look at it.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Wow. And so how does one show appreciation? Do you scratch her and say good kitty?

Gabe:
Oh, I'm terrified to. Better to kill a snake. Who knows when she can?

Superintendent Godfrey:
Oh yeah. I'm with ya. Okay. Do you have another question again?

Gabe:
How do you decide the lunch schedules? Because at Oquirrh, we are getting an insane amount of new kids and how are we going to decide the lunch schedules?  How does that work?

Superintendent Godfrey:
The school works to set up the lunch schedule and sometimes we have to, every once in a while, we have to have three so that you are split in between class with lunch and you can actually get two tardies in the same class if you're tardy, before lunch. And after that, what we really try to do is boil it down to two lunches. And we have a requirement for the number of hours and days that we held at school. So we try to balance that out with the number of hours that we need to provide instruction and getting everyone through the election. So your school be working on figuring that out.

Gabe:
Awesome.

Emily:
So this is a little bit of a piggyback, I guess, off games question. Just in general, do you ever create a policy for an individual school or is it usually just directing like blanket policies over the whole district?

Superintendent Godfrey:
Our policy manual started back in 1969 and it gets thicker every time something happens that is unique or that we're trying to help protect people. Sometimes something happens at an individual school and we make a policy and every policy applies to every school, every school. We try to provide as much flexibility as we can because just like Gabe pointed out, different schools have different needs. So we try to do things in a way so there are policies that cover issues that relate to every school, but enough flexibility so that schools can do what they need to with their lunch schedule or with their bell schedule and meet the needs of their students.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Lincoln, do you have another question for me?

Lincoln:
Saturdays? What do I like to do on Saturdays?

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's a great question. I like to avoid email if I can, but I really like to go to concerts and listen to music. I love live music, so I like to go to concerts and I like to go out to breakfast with my family. I have two sons and I like to go out to breakfast with my wife and two sons. Molly has to stay at home though. She doesn't get to come with us for that, but that's what I like to do on Saturdays.

Lincoln:
Cause a lot of restaurants don't like dogs to come in? Some of them let dogs come in. Does she likes to stay home?

Superintendent Godfrey:
It's okay. She lays down in the sun. How about you? What do you like to do on Saturday?

Lincoln:
Stay home, man. She knows my mom and dad. That's a good way to spend a Saturday for sure.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Gabe, Emily Lincoln. It's been a pleasure. Have a great school year. And if I can help you with anything along the way, let me know.

Students:
Thank you so much. Thank you.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thanks everyone out there and join us next time for the Supercast. And remember, education is the most important thing you'll do today.

Show Audio Transcription
Share the Supercast!

We head into a classroom at JATC South in Riverton where students are learning how to be barbers and hairstylists. Superintendent Godfrey sits down for his own hair cut and styled. Is it the popular Pompadour or does the Superintendent walk away with a Reverse Fade?

Then, CTE Director Jason Skidmore is in studio to talk about all the opportunities for students at JATC South and what parents need to know about the programs.


Audio Transcription

Superintendent Godfrey:
Welcome to the Supercast. I'm your host, Superintendent Anthony Godfrey. This is a Jordan School District podcast designed to educate, inform, and hopefully entertain you. If it's anything that's important to parents, students, teachers, or anything related to education, it's something we hope to feature on the Supercast. Today, I'm going for a haircut. Probably nothing special about that, unless you know I'm going to the JATC South, which is the Jordan Academy for Technology and Careers. They have some amazing programs there. And one of them is a Barbering and Hair Design program so it gets kids a head start on a career in cutting hair. They mostly work on mannequin heads, but today the hair that needed a little help was mine. So I headed down there and Senior Jose helped me. And he was just the man for the job.

Hi, I'm Dr. Godfrey. Your Jose.

Jose:
Yeah.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Alright. I guess I could have read that on your shirt. How swag. So you're going to give me a haircut today. So you're finishing your hour so you can get a license to be a barber. Is barber the right term?

Jose:
Yeah.

Jose:
Okay. Barber, do you want to hear my eighth grade geometry teacher's haircut joke thatI still remember from eighth grade?

Jose:
Okay.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Ask me if I want a haircut.

Jose:
Do you want a haircut?

Superintendent Godfrey:
No, I'd like them all cut.

Jose:
Okay.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Yeah. It's not that it's not that funny. So, I do really need just a trim. I don't want it too short.

Instructor:
I'm Dacia Peterson. I'm the Hair Design and Barbering Instructor. We are overcome just a little bit for your team around the side. We were just talking about his plan of how he's trimming. He will taper a little bit, clipper over comb and then use his shears to  finish the haircut.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What are some of the crazier names for haircuts that you teach? What's the most exotic sounding or exciting sounding.

Instructor:
The Pompadour has been really popular recently.

Superintendent Godfrey:
What else?

Instructor:
Some of the High Fades or a Ball Fade or a Skin Fade.

Superintendent Godfrey:
The Fade is popular. And I feel like my hair is fading on its own and that's not very popular with me. So when you say Fade, I hear something different.

Yeah. That is true.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Will you cut hair while you're going to school?

Jose:
Yeah. After this summer, in the fall, I'm going to go to SLCC for two years. And then go to the U to get my bachelor's degree.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Right.

Jose:
Because one day I just want to have my own barbershop.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Right.

Jose:
I have my own business pretty much.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So do you want to get a degree in business so that you can run your own barbershop?

Jose:
Yes, that's great. Now I'm going to do the taper in the back of your head with clipper over comb.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thanks Jose. Great job. That may be the best haircut I've ever had.

Jose:
I enjoyed doing it.

Instructor:
So that's a great way to get started into a career, to work your way through high school or work your way through college. Make a living. It's a license. They do have a license to go out and cut hair and color and work in a salon when they're done with their Hair Design program.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Savannah, I'm Anthony Godfrey.

Savannah:
Nice to meet you. So tell me about who we have here. Is this mannequin named?

Savannah:
No. I was trying to think of like a fancy French name for him because I name them based off their hairstyles, but I haven't thought of one for this one yet.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Oh, okay. So you name them, what is the hairstyle that you're giving her?

Savannah:
Right now I'm giving this guy a square layered haircut. So everything is just directed straight back.

Superintendent Godfrey:
And what is the name of that? Just square layer?

Savannah:
Yep. Squared. Yeah.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Sure. It's just, a squared haircut. Okay. And his name is?

Savannah:
I'm just going to go for something like Fabio.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Fabio. Yeah. I was thinking John Pierre.

Savannah:
I like that one better. We'll do that one.

Superintendent Godfrey:
With a hyphen.

Savannah:
Yes.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay. And is Jean-Pierre his beard gathered at the bottom because you have big plans for that or just to get it out of there?

Savannah::
And we'll get it out of the way later. We're going to do some fun stuff with this. Oh, we have a whole board of different, weird beards you can do. The beard wall is over there that we have.

Superintendent Godfrey:
You have a beard wall? The octopus right there, the Octopus?

Savannah:
Yes. And then there's the Long Boat.

Superintendent Godfrey:
The Long Boat, I don't know that I've ever seen the Long Boat.

Savannah:
Yeah. Some of these, I don't think I've ever seen anyone wear. There's Jack's Barrel right there too. The Hole Chain Man. That's a City. I think there was a person and a city.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I think you're right. I'm not quite sure. That's a very cosmopolitan design. Stubble.

Savannah:
That's shorter.  It's another one of the popular ones that I would see a lot more people.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Would I look more like Brad Pitt if I had a Designer Stubble?

Savannah:
Probably.

Superintendent Godfrey:
All right. I'm back in studio with my hair looking fantastic. And I'm here now with the Director of CTE. That's Jason Skidmore. And I've asked Jason just to give us a little bit of an overview of the programs. Tell us a little bit about yourself first, Jason.

Jason:
Hey Superintendent. Thanks for having me in today. And can I just say your hair really does look amazing. They did a great job. So glad you were able to stop by there.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thank you. That's not a compliment I get very often, and yours, Jason, if I may say, it looks incredible.

Jason:
I did stop down there the other day and they were needing to do something with a razor. And so my head was perfect for that. And I'm happy to say I left without any scars. We all have our role to play. So that's awesome.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Well, I was really impressed with the program. Your teacher is awesome. The kids obviously are really engaged in that. But that's just one of the programs that's available there. Right?

Jason:
Right. The Jordan Academy, the South campus that you were at, was designed to house many of the programs that we couldn't fit inside our traditional high schools, as you're aware. The Barbering program is one of the gems of that center. Many of the school districts across the state have kind of gone away from traditional education in career fields like cosmetology, barbering, nail technicians, even diesel mechanics or welding. There's a great need for those, but the training has been difficult to find qualified instructors to do that. And so we're fortunate to have some great instructors that help get our kids through that program.

Superintendent Godfrey:
It's a nice facility too, at the JATC South. What are some of the other programs that are available?

Jason:
So at the South campus, we have by our Science, Introduction to Firefighting is basically that program. We work with Unified Fire Authority and they train all of our students, introduce them to the field of a fire. We've got EMT. They also do that same. And students can walk out with a combination of fire science training, as well as an EMT, which qualifies them to work for any of the fire authorities or ambulance crews here across the state.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Both of those programs have a fairly military approach to the way they run things. There's a lot demanded of students. And I think that's what draws kids to the program. They know they're going to get a lot out of it.

Jason:
It does, you know, it's rigorous, not just mentally, but physically they gotta put a lot of time and effort and training into that.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So you've had it right on a very military-like structure to that program, right?

Jason:
Same with the Criminal Justice Program. Students can get an introduction to law enforcement. They work closely with the prison and other security facilities across the, the region. We also have a Web Design, we have a Game Design program that's housed at that campus. I mentioned the Nail Technician. There's diesel, and the welding technology. And so students can get a hands on and they get certification before they walk out the door so they can walk into any kind of welding facility. We also have available to students a Teacher Education Program.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So, students that are interested in going into education as their career, as you know, we have a shortage of teachers and it's something that Jordan District has taken on and doing, has had that program for many years. So well, it's a great place, great programs, great people providing that opportunity for students who can really come out, ready to work, whether they choose to do that profession longterm or whether it gets them through the next phase of their schooling and training. It's a really great step up to the next next level.

When we come back from our break, we're going to learn a little bit more about some of those individual programs and how you, as members of the public, can interact with those programs. But first, we'll take a little break. Join us again in just a moment.

Sandra Reisgraf:
In Jordan School District, the possibilities are endless for anyone looking to grow with a team of professionals, working together to provide the very best for students in education. If you're looking for a great job with great pay and benefits in a supportive environment, head to work@jordan.org and find your future career in Jordan School District. People come for the job and stay for the adventure. Explore the many options apply today.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Alright, and we're back. Jason Skidmore, the CTE Director for Jordan District is going to tell us a little bit more about some of the programs at JATC South. Tell us a little bit about the Nail Tech program.

Jason:
Our students who started that program, learned not only the basics of nail care, they understand color, they understand the chemicals that are used. And so they have to run a very safe environment in order for the clients come in and out of that center, as they prepare for their future. So it's all part of that. There are various competitions that students can attend and we've been fortunate. We've got a fabulous instructor and she's prepared for as all of our students. And over the last few years, we've had two or three students who continue to climb to the top across the state and actually competed at the national convention competition this last summer. We're always excited when students can not only show off their skills in the classroom, but when they can take them outside. That's one of the values of any CT program. It's not just in the classroom, it's what they can do in the community. It's what they can do in the career field. It's also what they can take into their personal life and develop their own interest in their own entrepreneurial spirit to create their own business.

Superintendent Godfrey:
So, if there's a parent out there who thinks, "Hey, I would love my son or daughter to be involved, or I know my son and daughter would be interested, what's the best way for them to approach that. Are there open houses? How can they find out more about the programs?

Jason:
There's an open house we hold every year, but probably the best thing to do would be to contact the school. You can go to jordantech.org and that'll give you the basic information and the contact numbers for individuals. You can call the center directly.

(801) 412-1300 That will get them in touch with the front office. And that will start them on their path. We have a counselor full-time there that they can talk to. What's gonna be best for the students and what's right for them, and they can create a plan that'll work for that student.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I would say to anyone out there listening, who has the slightest interest in programs of this type, I would suggest that you reach out and find out more about it because these programs are amazing. I've taken my son to try to get him involved. He's now graduated, but I try to get him hooked into one of those programs just because I love them so much. I think that there's so much to offer kids. And like I said, it doesn't have to be a longterm thing.

Now, there are some services that are available to members of the public who want to come in, have nails done and have their hair done. The EMT services are not available on a walk in basis or the fire services or welding. You can't come in. And I guess you could probably bring a job in at some point they'd say, Hey, I need some welding done.

Jason:
Yeah. On occasion, we do have members of the public that come in there. The one that we didn't mention that would also provide a service is the Greenhouse.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay. Oh yeah. That's right. Tell us about the greenhouse. I am the angel of death when it comes to plants.

Jason:
This is the place you need to be and spend some time. So, we do have a 10,000 square foot greenhouse there. And right now they're in the beginnings of preparing for the upcoming season. So next spring, you know, we do sell not only houseplants and annual seedlings or perennials, but we also sell garden vegetables. The community can come in and purchase as they prepare for their garden. And if you'd like some help, we can probably set you up with somebody to help you, Superintendent, to make sure that your thumbs can be a bit more green.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I should get a consult in the spring. I think my family would really appreciate that. So if someone wants to get an inexpensive haircut, have their nails done at a very affordable and reasonable price get some great plants at the greenhouse, they just visit that same website.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Visit the same website, jordantech.org, and that will get them to the right people. And they'll get information on what hours are available for what services and what time of the year.

Jason:
You can support students and get a great product for a low price.

And I would say one last thing. If you've got a student that you think likes to work with their hands, it just may be that's where you kind of see their inclination, check out any of these programs. It may or may not be for them, but if you don't look at it, you'll never know.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Great, great thought. All right. We're going to take a quick break and then we'll come back for our version of Two Truths and a Lie with Jason Skidmore, CTE Director. Thanks for being with us.

Steve Hall:
Hello. My name is Steven Hall. I'm Director of the Jordan Education Foundation. Have you ever experienced what it's like to surprise a teacher in the classroom with school supplies, books, or a classroom grant? Have you seen students all smiles because you care enough to give them a backpack, a winter coat, weekend food packs, or a free holiday shopping spree. It's something we see all the time, because it is exactly what Jordan Education Foundation does. The Foundation exists due to the generosity of people who care about kids. If you would like to be a part of supporting students and teachers in the classroom, contact Jordan EducationFoundation, and start making a difference today, you can find us at jordaneducationfoundation.org.

Superintendent Godfrey:
And we're back with Jordan School District CTE Director, Jason Skidmore. And we've been closing out the podcast with Two Truths and a Lie with the Superintendent. It's your chance to lie to the Superintendent. You know how the game goes. You tell me two truths and one lie, and I have to figure out which is which. Do you need some time or are you ready?

Jason:
I'm always ready to lie to the Superintendent.

Superintendent Godfrey:
You know, that's what everybody says. That's why we call him Stone Cold Skidmore, because he is just all right.

Jason:
I'm as ready as I'm going to be going up against you.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Let's hear it. Alrighty. You ready?

Jason:
I'm ready.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay. Hit me. All right. That's a lie. No, I'm just kidding. Okay.

Jason:
So, I spent a week at the Marine course training base and camp men, Camp Pendleton, where I survived the first week

Superintendent Godfrey:
You survived the first, the first week. Okay.

Jason:
I laid in the back of a refueling tanker during a refueling mission.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Okay. Laid in the bed.

Jason:
Well, you have to lay down to control the hose. That's how they refuel those. You don't just stand up and refill it. You gotta know that it's fair enough.

Jason:
And I've was a passenger in the back of an F-16 Atlanta at Hill Air Force Base.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Wow. This is our Veterans Day edition of the Supercast. Let me think here, Mr. Skidmore, or should I say Corporal Skidmore? I'm going to say that you have never landed at Hill AirForce Base.

Jason:
You are correct.

Superintendent Godfrey:
You did a week in the rain train camp.

Jason:
Yes, I did.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Well, you only need a week, so I can say, how did that go as an educator?

Jason:
Okay. So you were kind of recruiting screening where they wanted us to see what it looked like to be a Marine recruit for one week.

Superintendent Godfrey:
I'm in that experience. I am envious of that experience. I think that's really cool.

Jason:
I have a great passion for anybody who goes and serves in the Marines. That'sa tough, tough, tough training.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Do you have to climb the high walls with the rope and all that?

Jason:
The whole introduction into the yellow footprints. If you know that drill, that's the footprints, the day they arrive and they basically strip everything off backpack. I'm not closed, but they basically take them out, cut their hair, put them on the yellow footprints. And that's when the yelling begins. And that does not stop first weeks. I mean, it's a mental break. It's a place where they mentally try to break you down and then they bring you back. Then you arrive at 4:00 AM in the morning. You're tired and you just, it's chaos.

Superintendent Godfrey:
That's fantastic. That's great. All I know is the montages and various movies I've watched where the new grunt is climbing up and falls face first in the mud and someone steps on them and they just shake their head because they'll never make it. And then they rise above and triumph eventually. Yes. And well, well done, sir. You've had a wide breadth of experience but I guess you're not as good a liar as you thought you were.

Jason:
Wow. I've lost my name Stone cold.

Superintendent Godfrey:
Thank you very much to Director Jason Skidmore. Go to jordantech.org for more information. Thanks for joining us on the Supercast. And remember, education is the most important thing you'll do today. We'll see out there.

Show Audio Transcription
Share the Supercast!